Tag Archives: future

Excited, Nervous, and So Proud

The following blog was written by Easter Seals Greater Houston’s Ready to Achieve Mentoring Program (RAMP) coordinator and Transition Program Coordinator, Jacquelyn Privitera.

While there are countless ways that my job is fulfilling, sometimes, there are stories that really take the cake. My job is to help youth gain the skills they need to become successful members of their communities. Success will, of course, look different for each of them as they plan their futures and set their own goals. If I have been successful at my own job, they will all have the confidence and support to pursue whatever “success” looks like to them.

I’ve learned over the last seven years that there is often a lot of potential hiding behind a seemingly quiet student. Norma Puente is my favorite example of this. When I first started working with her at Margaret Long Wisdom High School, she largely kept to herself but would always participate when it was asked of her. Her sweet demeanor and the kindness she always showed to her classmates (and her ability to avoid joining in when all the students around her started to get rowdy) lead me to invite her to our annual Ready to Achieve Mentoring Program Conference in Washington D.C. that summer. Never having been on a plane, she was equal parts excited and nervous, but ultimately so proud of being considered for the opportunity and representing Houston.

When we arrived in D.C., there were students from RAMP sites around the country and without a hint of nerves or trepidation, they all became fast friends. I’ve heard so many stories over the years from these students that making friends was hard for them, but at this conference, you’d absolutely never know it. There is an immediate sense of camaraderie and any walls that they had up fall with breakneck fervor. I’ve never left this annual conference without crying at least once. These kids are truly inspiring…and putting them all together in one room? It’s something to behold.

Part of being invited to the conference is that each student has to deliver a presentation about their future career goals or projects they’ve worked on at their respective RAMP sites that school year. Norma chose to present on Criminology which would soon be her college major. The previously reserved student lit up with apparent passion when she got to talk about her future. She would be the first member of her family to go to college. She would help people who needed her. She would make something of herself – and she couldn’t wait to do any of it.

Norma was then given the opportunity to join local students at the Teen and Police Service Academy; an important and amazing partnership between the Houston Police Department and the University of Houston Clear Lake designed for at-risk youth and police officer mentors. She said it made her feel like a leader and made her confident in speaking in front of groups all while giving her more insight into the future she was carefully preparing for herself. The next summer, I asked her to return to Washington D.C. with me. She was the leader of the pack; guiding all the students who attended and offering encouragement to nervous students giving their presentations for the first time. During a long silence where a student couldn’t bring himself to speak from fear, she stood up, told us all to cheer him on, and got us all clapping. After that, he gave a great presentation. And I really looked at Norma in awe.

She graduated high school in 2019 and has gotten right to work since then. She is working at Care Optical where she deals with prescriptions and sealing glasses and she is enrolled at Houston Community College in their Criminology Program – yep, the first one in her family to go to college. When she graduates, she plans to attend the police academy and go for her Bachelor’s degree in Criminology.

I keep in touch with Norma and when I recently asked her if she thinks RAMP helped her, she responded:

RAMP helped me in so many ways. This program helped me get on track with my career path and to think ahead to the future. It helped me to grow and allowed me to come out of my bubble and interact with other people with no problem. It made me a leader and because of this program I can say I have grown as a person and am doing better. It made me want to keep up with my studies and to become someone.”

I’m proud to be a part of her story and I am so proud to know her and all the incredible students I meet through Easter Seals Greater Houston’s RAMP and Transition Programs. If you’re wondering, being a mentor will never waste a single minute of your time.

Learn more about participating in Easter Seals Greater Houston’s RAMP Program as a mentor or mentee.

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Countless Success and Growing

Easter Seals Greater Houston’s Early Childhood Intervention Program (ECI) is for children from birth to 36 months and includes a comprehensive range of services including developmental services, speech, physical and occupational therapy, nutrition, vision, hearing and case management services which are all provided in the family’s home or daycare.  All of the children eligible for early intervention have a serious delay in at least one area of development or a diagnosed medical condition that places them at high risk.  Effective September 1, Easter Seals Greater Houston’s ECI program will expand to serve Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Leon, Madison, Robertson, Walker and Washington Counties. The Infant Development/ECI team will serve 1,400 children each month with countless success stories like Ja’Shawn.

Ja’Shawn is a handsome 34 month old littleJeShawn Blocks 1 boy that has been in ECI since the age of 12 months. He failed his newborn hearing screening at the hospital and was born with asymmetric and abnormal pinnae, which has resulted in a severe to profound hearing loss.  Since that time, he’s received Easter Seals Greater Houston’s Early Childhood Intervention services such as Occupational, Physical & Speech Therapy, Specialized Skills Training, and Case management during his enrollment. With his diagnosis, he also benefits from Auditory Impairment or AI services though the public school system. During the visit-the AI teacher, Ms. Peggy was providing therapy to him.  The uniqueness of ECI’s visit shined though during their interaction. Ms. Peggy and Ja’Shawn were baking cupcakes and frosting them. Ms. Peggy explained they counted the cupcakes, labeled during the mixing, and also washed the dishes when done. These routines based interventions help Ja’Shawn learn to sign each of the tasks. For example, he signed “cookies, please”, “thank-you”, “help, please” He is able to follow 2 step directions and signs up to 3 words together.  Ja’Shawn’s mom, Sabrina, also says he reads lips when other adults are not able to sign with him.

JeShawn 1Ja’Shawn turns three soon and has been evaluated for the PPCD, preschool program for children with disabilities program with his local ISD.  Sabrina is hoping he’s accepted to a special school in the district that has a signing program and ECI will help her advocate for that to ensure smooth transition of services!

If you have concerns or questions about your child’s development, please call 713.838.9050, ext. 385 and request a free developmental assessment.

Early Childhood Intervention, Easter Seals Greater Houston

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Getting the MOST Out of Camp

 

GroupCamp MOST (Miles of Smiles for Teens) is Easter Seals Greater Houston’s three-day overnight retreat for teens with cerebral palsy. Camp MOST and Easter Seals’ Transition Program teamed up to create four jam sessions, group sessions for learning and reflection. The four topics covered self esteem; understanding realistic vs. unrealistic expectations and exploring options; conflicts and setbacks; and envisioning the future. Great group chats were had, and they didn’t stop when the sessions ended- you could hear the teens still talking about the topics around the table at mealtimes!

Ever wonder who our Camp MOST teens are or what they’re like?  Here’s a glimpse, in their own words:

DSC_0004What are you good at?

  • Writing & reading
  • Painting
  • Making friends
  • Learning
  • Art & being sassy
  • Listening
  • Swimming & running
  • Making conversation
  • Coding
  • Expressing my opinion
  • Riding horses
  • Video games
  • Making people laugh

What are your goals and ambitions?

  • Get stronger physically
  • Lower my school stress
  • Be the best person I can be
  • Publish a book
  • Continue to go to school and work
  • Work hard in school
  • Go to college and move out
  • Finish college
  • Express myself
  • Do well at Rodeo
  • Transfer to a 4 year college, get a degree, and become a web designer
  • Walk across the stage at graduation (from a camper who uses a wheelchair)

What makes you strong?DSC_0097

  • My spirit to get back up
  • My kindness
  • Having a good heart
  • Being myself
  • The people who love me
  • My work ethic
  • My sense of humor
  • Church
  • The support and encouragement I get from friends on social media

My future is bright because…

  • I’m going to try my best in life
  • I’ll be graduating soon
  • I do amazing at school
  • My positive attitude
  • My family and friends support me
  • I’m me
  • I’m talented
  • I’m going to prom with a pretty girl
  • I work hard, I don’t give up, and I don’t feel sorry for myself

Special thanks to Jacquelyn Miller, Easter Seals Greater Houston’s Ready to Achieve Mentoring Program (RAMP) Coordinator/Transition Coordinator, for adapting the curriculum for Camp MOST, and to Amy Burgdorf for facilitating the jam sessions.

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