Tag Archives: teens with disabilities

Celebrating NDEAM – National Disability Employment Awareness Month

David Wright is a recent graduate of Stephen F. Austin High School in Sugar Land where he was in our Easter Seals Houston High School High Tech / RAMP (Ready to Achieve Mentoring) program since his freshman year. David has been interested in becoming a herpetologist for a long time and knows A LOT about it. Freshman year it was hard for our staff to keep him on track because he always wanted to talk about lizards, snakes, and reptiles. We literally couldn’t get him to talk about anything else! Through the years David got better about this, was more open to participating in what the class was doing and it was obvious he was starting to pick up on the importance of our mentoring and lessons about social cues and soft skills and more. Jacquelyn Privatera Miller went with him to his interview for the internship at the Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land and he was SO professional, acted like a well prepared young adult and dressed himself so well for the interview. Everyone was really impressed. David is thriving in this environment and has opened up more and can have great conversations with people including his new co-workers. He even hugs Jacquie now when he sees her, which he would never ever have done before. So really he has just grown and matured so much in the last few years and is doing a really impressive job at his internship!  Help us congratulate David  as he is enjoying his 20 hours/week internship AND is also enrolled at Wharton Community College! Huge thanks to the museum and the museum staff for making it a life changing experience for David!

High School/High Tech is a community-based partnership of parents, educators, rehabilitation professionals and business representatives working together to encourage students with disabilities to explore the fields of science, engineering and technology. Only 56% of students with disabilities graduate from high school. High School/High Tech was developed to address this situation. Most individuals with disabilities have not had the encouragement, role models, access and stimulation to pursue challenging technical careers or courses of study. Through High School/High Tech, students with disabilities are presented a mix of learning experiences that promote career exploration and broaden educational horizons. High School/High Tech also offers a mentoring program called RAMP – Ready to Achieve Mentor Program. Learn more about High School/High Tech.

Jacquelyn Miller, Easter Seals Greater Houston, High School High Tech / RAMP

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Transition Success and Walmart Employee of the Month!

Our Easter Seals Greater Houston Transition team met Paul and his mother last June  as a Hogg Foundation for Mental Health Transition Age Youth Project of Easter Seals Greater Houston/DARS client.  Thanks to the Hogg Foundation, this project offers services and support for persons, ages 16 – 27, who have are on the spectrum and have a co-occurring mental illness and is designed to help youth become more independent and successful in their communities. The many facets of the program include social skills training, supported employment, summer internships, college classes at the Houston Community College VAST Academy, BCBA Services, peer supports, referral assistance, financial coaching, on-line driver’s Education and access to our mobile technology program.

Paul had just graduated from Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas. His only work history was as a volunteer through a high school program with a couple of companies in the Pasadena area.  Paul and his parents wanted him to find a part-time job with a number of specific permanents such as close to home, after 4:00 pm and Monday thru Friday.  Together, Paul and his transition counselor, Robert Aranda, created a resume reflecting his volunteer experience and a reference list of his former supervisors.  They met to complete on-line applications, practiced mock interviews and reviewed social skills for interviewing techniques. Paul interviewed with companies through Summer and Fall.

In December, Wal-Mart called Paul in for an interview.  His Transition Counselor says he is a very likable and responsible individual and that he really wants to show his parents that he is able to expand his learning curve and become more independent.  Paul’s interview at Wal-Mart was a hit with the Human Resources Department and he was hired this past December as a Cart Attendant.  Wal-Mart was very accommodating with assisting Paul with the work schedule he needed.  Within two months, Paul’s supervisors noted his work great ethic, enthusiasm and customer service.  Paul was selected Employee of the Month for February!!

Robert Aranda, Transition Specialist, Easter Seals Greater Houston
RAranda@eastersealshouston.org

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Anchors Aweigh Campers

IMG_1272Ahoy from Camp MOST (Miles of Smiles for Teens)! This past weekend, Easter Seals Greater Houston hosted Camp MOST– a weekend retreat for young adults with cerebral palsy and other neurological disorders. Our theme this spring was Anchors Aweigh- we had nautical decorations, activities, and snacks! With 14 amazing campers and 17 amazing counselors we set sail for a fun filled weekend!

IMG_1175On Friday, the campers docked at Camp For All around dinner time. That night, we had an awesome Amazing Race activity and then a campfire complete with s’mores, skits, and some campfire songs. On both Saturday and Sunday Camp MOST hit some rough waters- it rained off and on both days. Despite the rain, our camp had the MOST fun! We got to participate in canoes, fishing, photography, archery, paintball, ZIPLINING, and most of all our amazing Jam Sessions.

In our Jam Sessions, we talked about awesome topics related to transition into young adulthood, and what that looks like as a teen with a disability. In the first Jam Session we discussed how independence doesn’t mean doing it all alone. Topics included learning to speak up and self-advocate during IEP meetings and college advising meetings. Later in the day campers were asked to “Set Your Course!” and each shared what they want and what they need to do to achieve this goal.

Each camper ended the weekend with fantastic memories, new friends, and a plan to set their course in order to achieve their dreams! All aboard for success!

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“I want to figure out where I am in life and who I truly am. Step 1: Don’t listen to the negative talk/self-talk”

Mackenzie Richard, Camp Coordinator, Easter Seals Greater Houston

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Caring for the Caregiver

The following was written by the parents of one of our beloved clients that have participated in Easter Seals Greater Houston’s Family Day Out and Respite Voucher programs for many years.

Family Day Out is a center-based Respite service 20171007_102818that provides respite care on Saturdays to families of children ages 6-14 with all types of disabilities. Our son, Brandon, and the other children benefit from arts and crafts, games, and playground activities and receive one-on-one assistance from volunteers. As parents we benefit greatly with much needed time to get caught up on anything we may need to get done (paperwork, house work …the list goes on) or even have a much needed day date! (Dates are far and in between!) Family Day Out also gives us much needed one-on-one time with our daughter. Children that have siblings with disabilities often don’t get as much attention due to the high demand kids with disabilities require. It’s a great opportunity to spend quality time with siblings.

What we love most about Family Day Out is that our son is able to spend time with volunteers, staff, and friends that over the years have gotten to know and love him.  Each session is also staffed by a nurse and a center director. It’s somewhere he feels 100% accepted and has tons of fun.

20161203_114712We are so grateful to have been able to look forward to at least one Saturday several months a year that Brandon will be well taken care of while having fun so we can have time to ourselves, guilt-free. This September will be a sad one since the Family Day Out program is only able to accommodate kids through 14 years old at this time and Brandon turns 15 at the end of September.

We also participate in Easter Seals’ Respite Voucher Program which allows us to select our own childcare provider for in-home care. These hours allow us to run errands and take a much-needed break while Brandon is with someone we know and trust to care for him. As Brandon has gotten older the respite hours to use at our leisure have become as much of a blessing as Family Day Out. Qualified sitters (those who can handle meltdowns, behavior issues, etc.) for children with disabilities have a much higher rate than typical sitters so the respite hour vouchers help tremendously when funds are already tight.

Easter Seals Greater Houston’s 20171007_130244

Family Day Out program and Respite Voucher program are truly blessings to ours and so many other families!

Thank you,

Jeff and Tiffany, Respite client parents, Easter Seals Greater Houston

Learn more about Easter Seals’ Care Giving Services.

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Interviewing for the Future

Being a good interviewer is a skill we should all have. I got my first job slicing meats and scooping salads in our grocery store’s deli, but I imagine that’s only because my dad worked there. I was hardly interview ready and showed up wearing jeans. Luckily practice makes perfect and throughout the years I’ve gained the skills necessary to feel confident when I sit across from the person who may or may not make it possible for me to pay my bills. But, teenagers are often terrified of the idea of an interview just as I had once been.HSHT MID 2017-19

Interviewing skills, resume writing, soft skills, and professionalism are all heavily covered topics in Easter Seals Greater Houston’s High School/High Tech and Ready to Achieve Mentoring Program (RAMP) classes. We want our students to ace any interview they walk in to and that takes a lot of practice. Leading up to our annual Mock Interview Day, we talk about what they should wear and how they should answer popular interview questions as well as why they should smile, make eye contact, and have good firm handshakes. We do everything we can to prepare our youth and they usually seem ready to go but inevitably, when they line up in the hallway to begin the first of their three short mock interviews, the panic sets in. I can understand why – our volunteer interviewers are very professionally dressed, sitting tall and stoic in their seats and it immediately makes all of the students doubt their skills and forget everything we taught them. However, over the course of the day, something really great happens. You can see these young people feel confident and proud of themselves. They leave their first interview with a grade sheet that usually tells the same tale – they did well, but have a few things they need to work on. At the second interview, they’ve worked on these shortcomings and did a pretty good job! By their third, they’re old pros comparing near perfect scores with each other in the hallway. Watching a young person believe they can do something well is pretty amazing.

HSHT MID 2017-45This year, Carmen Phillips, the newest member of Easter Seals Greater Houston’s High School/High Tech team, hosted her own Mock Interview Day and included a fun new activity that got students talking with each other and moving around. By making each student their own business cards to share and use for networking with other students, Carmen was able to make every student social. Even the most shy or reserved students made an effort to network with others and talk about themselves in between mock interviews. This was a fun new mock interview day inclusion that we will be using every year to get our youth excited about sharing what they know with other people.

HSHT MID 2017-05Yvonne Kelly and I enjoyed watching students at our Mock Interview Day in League City cut each other in line to be able to do their second or third interviews before one another because they had gotten such great scores and couldn’t wait to do it again! We had a funny and boisterous group this year and they made the day so fun.

Watching all of our youth participate, feel accomplished, and actually be excited about interviewing is such a reward for us as each Mock Interview Day ends. We can’t wait to see what next year brings as we prepare our students for their transition out of high school and into the world of college and work!

Jacquie Privitera Miller, RAMP and Transition Coordinator, Easter Seals Greater Houston

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Chaos and Trauma for a Family with a Child with Special Needs

reat_familykevinjohnson-4.jpgThe following story was written by BridgingApps’ Co-Founder, Cristen. Cristen and her son Vincent, who has special needs, were Easter Seals Greater Houston’s Walk With Me 2017 Ambassadors and have been dear friends of Easter Seals Greater Houston for years. Cristen graciously shared her story to show how having a loved one with a disability compounded the difficulty and stress faced during Hurricane Harvey.

 

Our house was built in 1955 and has never flooded. We typically have a modest hurricane and emergency kit prepared during Hurricane season. During Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Ike, I evacuated with both my sons, while my husband stayed to prepare and salvage the house.  As Harvey moved closer, we decided that this time we would not evacuate, but would shelter in place.

You see, my 14 year old son, Vincent, who has Down syndrome, a visualVincent-and-Cristen impairment and extreme sensory issues, generally is a good traveler, but sometimes he has difficulties with transitions. As he has gotten older, he has also gotten more opinionated, making an evacuation less desirable. This time, I made sure that we had enough medications, water and food.

However, we were not prepared for the amount of rain that kept coming and coming. We lost power in the middle of the night on Saturday. Our home is located 3 blocks from Brays Bayou, and we watched the water rise, then crest, then continue to rise on our street, and then in our yard. Most of the homes in our neighborhood are one story homes, and we could see our neighbors begin to flood. The water came into our garage, and we thought it was not long before it would come into our home. We decided to evacuate our home and go to a neighbor that was higher two blocks away.

In the span of about 30 minutes with zero planning, we threw important papers, picture albums and some clothing into our attic. We scrambled to get all of Vincent’s medications, shoes with orthotics, two pairs of different prescription glasses, incontinence supplies, and two days’ worth of clothing into backpacks and garbage bags. We attempted to save his $1500 adaptive stroller by throwing it on top of our car, because we knew it would take forever to get approval for another one.

My 17 year old son Martin volunteered to carry my 80 pound son Vincent to our neighbor’s house. My husband and I carried everything else. It was a challenge to explain to Vincent, who has a cognitive disability, that we needed to put on his raincoat and walk out in the pouring rain into water that was nearly waist deep on his brother’s back. My goal was to do it in a lighthearted way, but my voice broke, and it became impossible. Tears were streaming down my face, so I was glad for the rain to camouflage this awful fear in front of my children.

As we plunged into the cold water, it was amazing how small things like the sidewalk, bricks, tree roots, curbs and other small obstacles became huge obstacles, causing Martin to stumble, trip, and nearly drop Vincent multiple times. The truth is that if they fell and he went under water, the current was so strong, I am not sure that we would have found him.  It was hard for Vincent to see out of his glasses with the rain coming down, and it must have been terrifying for him. His preferred spot in life is on the floor, as it is predictable, steady and safe.

Martin had to rest, so we got to the front porch of a house at the intersection of our street. As we rested there, we saw people chest high in water carrying their dog. We had no idea where they were trying to go, and I am not sure they did either. At that moment, we saw a kayak two houses away. My husband got their attention, and it turns out they a couple in their 70s and offered to take us one by one to our friend on the next block who was on higher ground.  It was a given that Vincent would go first, so I had to explain to him that he needed to get into a “special boat” with complete strangers to get to our friend Carolyn’s house. As we maneuvered him into the unsteady kayak, he slowly sat on the lap of a woman named Diane. I kissed him and told him that I would see him in a few minutes. I simply could not believe how strong the current was, swiftly rushing towards Brays Bayou, as the kayak had to navigate across the intersection with my most vulnerable child.  I watched helplessly and had to trust that he would be ok.

It was at that moment that I broke down and had what I imagine was a FULL ON panic attack. I was unable to breathe and nearly fell down. My sweet husband Daniel, thought I was having an asthma attack and asked where my inhaler was.  In the pouring rain, in the middle of a swift river of water I wanted to smack him for not realizing that I was having a PANIC attack, not an asthma attack.

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It seemed like FOREVER when the kayak returned reporting that they had safely deposited Vincent at our friend Carolyn’s house.  One by one the rest of us were ferried to her house, where we waited out the rest of the day and night of continuous rain and no power.

On Monday, when the water had receded enough, we returned to our house and watched the news that the forecast showed nothing but rain. Though Brays Bayou had gone down its banks a bit, with the power back on in our house, the weather reports were nothing but rain and prediction that Brays was going to crest again.  We immediately decided to evacuate a second time to another friend’s house about 2 miles north of our home. This decision was based completely on the best place for Vincent. We determined where we would go based on which friends of ours had not flooded yet, did not have a cat (allergies), and had enough room where Vincent could have his own space because of his sensory issues.

We returned to our house on Wednesday to begin the clean-up and on Saturday had to be evacuated AGAIN because of a bad gas leak in our yard.  We hadn’t even unpacked from the 2nd evacuation, so it seemed to be easier than the other two, but we as a family were nearly at a breaking point emotionally.  Vincent’s daily schedule is predictable, planned out and communicated to him to reduce his anxiety. The previous 7 days had been everything but predictable. It was emotional, stressful, unpredictable, and frustrating.  For most families dealing with this hurricane was horrific, but for our family with a child who has cognitive and sensory issues, it was tremendously difficult.  Luckily our house sustained only minor damage, but the toll it has taken on our whole family will take weeks to recover.  It has changed the way I will prepare for disasters, and it will change forever the way that we discuss it with our children.

Cristen Reat, Parent and BridgingApps Co-Founder, Easter Seals Greater Houston

As of today, thousands have been begun to receive direct client services as well as clothing, medical equipment, and assistance from Easter Seals Greater Houston. These families have been through a major trauma; please donate to help us meet their needs.If you or someone you know needs assistance, please contact us at Harvey@eastersealshouston.org. If you or your company would like to partner with Easter Seals, please contact us at Info@eastersealshouston.org.

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Free Summertime Fun!

Are you looking for ways to get your children involved this Summer? Come and join one of our fun Play Groups! Our Play Groups are free and offered on Tuesday evenings (with the exception of Play-A-Palooza) at our Easter Seals main office.

Karate– Through participation in this class, IMG_3928your child will learn balance and self-control through various drills and independent lessons. These practices include training in martial arts etiquette, respect for authority and self-esteem. Using a goal setting martial arts curriculum, participants gain confidence through repetition, guidance, and praise. Karate is open to ages 6 to 18 years old. Karate is on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month from 6:00pm to 6:45pm.

 

Yoga– Yoga emphasizes stretching and breathing techniques designed to enhance development. Teachers reinforce memory, independence, and group focus! Yoga is open to ages 4 to 18 years old. Yoga is on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month from 6:50pm to 7:35pm.

Dance– Our dancers dance, prance, and play group blog photo 3imagine what to do with a scarf – all the while not realizing that they are focusing, following directions, and using their imaginations. Dance is on the 3rd Tuesday of the month from 6:30pm to 7:15pm

 

Teen Night –Teen Night is open to teens ages 14 and up with a primary diagnosis of cerebral palsy or a similar neurological disorder with a developmental age of at least a 12-year-old. They must understand topics discussed relevant to the 12-18 year old age group. Our Teens will have an opportunity to socialize, play games, and attend a Jam Session! Teen Night is held the 1st Tuesday of every month from 6:00pm to 7:30pm.

Pet Therapy –Clients will get the opportunity to playplay group blog photo 2 with our pet therapy dogs, see tricks, and enjoy their furry company! All ages are welcome. Pet Therapy will be on the 3rd Tuesday of every month from 5:30pm to 6:30pm.

Play-A-Palooza – Our adapted Play-A-Palooza play group incorporates play and music to build cognitive and physical skills (for ages 0-5 years old). Play-A-Palooza in Stafford is held on the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of the month from 10:30am to 11:20am. The Stafford location is 12300 Parc Crest Dr. Stafford, TX 77477.

To be added to our Easter Seals Greater Houston Play Group Database to receive weekly updates, please contact Lindsey Holton at 713-838-9050 x 309 or at lholton@eastersealshouston.org

For more information on our Play Groups please visit us at www.eastersealshouston.org

Lindsey Holton, Easter Seals Greater Houston, Program Director

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